Back on Track

A few weeks ago, I was on vacation for two weeks while my mom was visiting. It was a really beautiful time. The only problem is that my diabetes care went on vacation too. It was as if my diabetes knew I needed it to behave, and it refused to follow any logic.

Honestly. I can’t even describe the phenomenon. I would eat relatively low carb and still be 150+ a few hours after my bolus. I would correct a 200 mg/dl blood sugar and still wake up three hours later higher than I was before. I’d correct that, and I’d still wake up high. Hello. There was nothing wrong with my pump site, my insulin, or my stress levels. I even ran higher temp basals. No explanation. I’ve had T1D for 10.5 years, and this still baffles me.

One thing I will admit, is that my diet significantly changed. It’s completely possible that my body could not stand the change of carbohydrate intake. I eat LCHF, typically around 30-50g of carbs per day. On vacation, I was eating 100+. This only reassures me that eating LCHF is the best choice for me, personally.

So today, I am celebrating the victory of being back on track. Every once in a while we are allowed to fall off, but jumping back up is so important. We are important. We cannot cheat ourselves of the care we deserve.

Here’s to two full days without a blood sugar over 150 mg/dl!

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3 comments

  1. I had a full week of eating out almost every day and my experience was the same as yours. Correction after correction and increasing basals a lot to finally get the highs to come down. A daily carb limit seems to work best for me to manage bgs.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Leah, sorry to read of your frustration. It’s funny how insulin sometimes becomes as effective as water. Well, not really funny.

    It’s the fat.

    Dietary fat increases insulin resistance. It’s as if the cells in the body say: “Enough, don’t feed me fat!” And they close the door to insulin. As a result glucose stays longer in the blood.

    Being away from home is especially challenging, as our control over what goes into our food is limited. Chefs cook everything with oil. It’s even hard to find ordinary bread without oil added to it.

    Last week I indulged myself and gave in to my addiction to peanuts. Blood glucose out of control for the next 24 hours! The silver lining is that we diabetics know about it immediately.

    Congrats on being back on track!

    Like

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